Standards and Guidelines for the Preservation of Historic Stained Glass Windows

 

The primary goal of conservation professionals, stained glass restorers, conservators and consultants is the preservation of cultural property. This property may be important and deserving of preservation for its artistic, historic, religious or social significance. This property is invaluable and must be preserved for the appreciation and investigation of future generations. It is not enough for conservators to properly handle a given object or objects; they must also be committed to the dissemination of new information, the support of fellow professionals and the promotion of educational opportunities within the field.

Virtually all professional disciplines, construction trades and major industries have standards and practices that are universal for their respective groups. The development of these criteria determines the measure of value and quality that the consumer can reasonably expect when purchasing goods or services that the industry or profession has to offer. Further, the standards and practices protect the members of the industry as well, by establishing a standard so that the practitioners can address the needs of the owners and the cultural property in a consistent, professional manner. It is imperative that all members of the industry exhibit the courage and integrity to adhere to the standards and practices once they are established and to demand that fellow craftspersons do the same.

The Stained Glass Association of America, in its role as the voice of the stained glass profession in America, sets forth herein the Preservation Standards, Standards for Professional Conduct, and Guidelines for Preservation Techniques to assist responsible conservators of stained glass windows that constitute a major and important facet of our cultural property.

Outline of Topics Covered

I. Introduction

Purpose

Conventions

II. Preservation Standards

III. Standards for Professional Conduct

Contracts

Conflicts of interest

Legal disputes

Laws and regulations

Misconduct

References

Administration

Security

Authentication

Preventive maintenance

Techniques and materials

IV. Guidelines for Preservation Techniques

Documentation

Dismantling

Cleaning

Broken glass

Copperfoil repair

Silicone edge-gluing

Epoxy edge-gluing

Missing glass

Releading

Waterproofing (Cementing)

Support Systems

Reinstallation

Final documentation

Protective glazing

V. Additional Information

Glass

Setting materials

Conservation tape

Photographic film

Paper

Cleaning agents

Silicone

Epoxy

Lead cames

Flux

Solder

Waterproofing compound

Copper tie wires

Support bars, Tees and Fins

Suggested Standard Notation

Symbols

The complete second edition of
The Standards and Guidelines for the Preservation of Historic Stained Glass Windows
is available from the SGAA Executive Offices by calling 800.438-9581.